Ollioules, France

Villa dragonfly – SOLD

250 m²  – design by Rudy Ricciotti – under compromise of sale

Set on terraced embankments, this glass house on the hills of the commune of Ollioules is designed by renowned architect Rudy Ricciotti. Submerged in vegetation, rather like a dragonfly, the residence faces the Mediterranean. This untamed corner of paradise offers a panoramic view stretching from the Bay of Sanary to the waterfront of Toulon.

Thanks to its long glass wall, the architecture unites indoor and outdoor areas. The golden rule is effacement, in order to live in harmony with nature. Forming an anti-chamber to the forest at the rear of the building, the landscaped garden has been entirely preserved by means of an integration procedure making for economic flooring set into the various levels of the steeply sloping ground.

The vegetalized roof and climbing wisteria which invades the pergola merge the house into its environment while preserving coolness indoors. Set against ancient embankment walls, the property’s construction has contributed towards restoration of these drystone walls supporting a plot of land of almost 2.5 acres.

The living space of 250 sq. metres offers a vast reception room of 95 m² with an open kitchen fitted with Gaggenau appliances. A minimalist style for the lounge area which opens outside through picture windows 6 metres long and benefits from a hearth built into the wall. One rediscovers the blend of concrete and glass, and the constant presence of nature. At no time is the house’s length of 57 metres (including the pool) interrupted. The corridor is thus a natural prolongation of the space. Indirect lighting is built into the floors and walls to form a long line of light. The house also benefits from underfloor heating. At the far end, one gets a glimpse of the master bedroom’s inner garden. The corridor leads to five bedrooms, including the master suite with its shower room and walk-in closet, a bathroom, movie lounge and laundry room. Ending this level, the master bedroom, rather like a “flying carpet”, opens out to the panoramic view through its picture windows. The decor is sober, allowing the beauty of the scenery to come into its own. The residence comes with a garage for one car, outdoor parking space for several vehicles, and an elevator to the terrace.

In summer, the heat is intense in this part of the South of France. The huge terrace of 130 sq. metres therefore provides areas of shade fitted out beneath large “solar sails”. The flooring is made of Siberian larch, a robust wood with a natural greyish hue. The railing composed of cables and black boat netting provides security while remaining highly discreet.

The heated 20-metre pool is a direct prolongation of the house: perspective is thus unbroken over 57 metres. The combination of concrete and glass is particularly effective thanks to the transparency of the water, framed by these natural materials. The back of the pool is black, the colour which, in fact, disappears the most, and gives the pool its lake effect. A heated whirlpool allows one to relax outdoors, even in the off-season.

The garden extends over the entire hillside, where the embankment walls have all been restored. Once a field of flowers, the grounds have mostly been left wild. Around the house, fruit and palm trees flourish together with vines, white laurels, olive trees and small sky-blue flowers.

The plate glass windows give the constant impression of living outdoors. A real architectural masterpiece in the art of immersion.

Prix : Price Upon Request

Contact us
Print
Ref :

© Cerise Doucède

Concrete is the predominant material used for this villa, and one of the signatures of architect Rudy Ricciotti. For him, it is an “architectural self-evidence“.

I am a fervent defender of architecture at the crossroads between the primitive dimension of concrete and the most spectacular engineering” Rudy Ricciotti.

Our selection

FAVORITE OF THE EXPLORER

Rémi Guisset

+33 (0)6 60 89 20 11
remiguisset@lexploreur.com

Jérémy Bailet

+33 (0)6 61 01 71 08
jeremybailet@lexploreur.com